Tags Plate tectonics

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Geologists find lost fragment of ancient continent in Canada’s North

Sifting through diamond exploration samples from Baffin Island, Canadian scientists have identified a new remnant of the North Atlantic craton—an ancient part of Earth's...

Building blocks for life on Earth arrived much later than we...

Ancient rocks from Greenland have shown that the elements necessary for the evolution of life did not come to Earth until very late in...

Geologists determine early Earth was a ‘water world’ by studying exposed...

The Earth of 3.2 billion years ago was a "water world" of submerged continents, geologists say after analyzing oxygen isotope data from ancient ocean...

New pieces of evidence found in the Alborán Sea possibly related...

Under the waters of the eastern Alborán Sea and buried at the shadow of an old volcanic edifice lies a body of sediments that...

Heat transport property at the lowermost part of the Earth’s mantle

Lattice thermal conductivities of MgSiO3 bridgmanite and postperovskite (PPv) phases under the Earth's deepest mantle conditions have been determined by quantum mechanical computer simulations....

As groundwater depletes, arid American West is moving east

Even under modest climate warming scenarios, the continental United States faces a significant loss of groundwater -- about 119 million cubic meters, or roughly...

Hidden past of Earth’s oldest continents unearthed

New international research led by the University of St Andrews presents a novel way to understand the structure and formation of our oldest continents. The...

Lithospheric thickening beneath the Betics and Rif mountains pulls down the...

A new study made by researchers at the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the Spanish National Research Council (ICTJA-CSIC) has been able...

New insights into the formation of Earth’s crust

New research from Mauricio Ibanez-Mejia, an assistant professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester, gives scientists better insight into the...

Study explores the density of the tectonic plates and why they...

A fast collision rate between tectonic plates and a young age (millions of years) are two factors that favour the sinking of the lithosphere...

The Antarctic: Data about the structure of the icy continent

The Antarctic is one of the parts of earth that we know the least about. Due to the massive ice shield, the collection of...

Study points to one cause for several mysteries linked to breathable...

Earth's breathable atmosphere is key for life, and a new study suggests that the first burst of oxygen was added by a spate of...

Extra-terrestrial impacts may have triggered ‘bursts’ of plate tectonics

When -- and how -- Earth's surface evolved from a hot, primordial mush into a rocky planet continually resurfaced by plate tectonics remain some...

New geologic modeling method explains collapse of ancient mountains in American...

By using the latest computer numerical modeling technologies, combined with geologic compilations and seismic data, researchers in the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook...

Telescopes and satellites combine to map entire planet’s ground movement

Curtin University research has revealed how pairing satellite images with an existing global network of radio telescopes can be used to paint a previously...

What makes the Earth’s surface move?

Do tectonic plates move because of motion in the Earth's mantle, or is the mantle driven by the movement of the plates? Or could...

Collision course: A geological mystery in the Himalayas

According to Craig Martin, deciphering Earth's geologic past is like an ant climbing over a car crash. "You've got to work out how the...

Study provides new insight into the origin of Las Cañadas caldera...

Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands) is the result of different episodes of caldera collapses, associated to large explosive eruptions that triggered several landslides...

Unusual fault rupture during Kaikōura quake

One of the 24-plus faults that ruptured in the 2016 magnitude 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake has turned out to be even more unusual than scientists...

Why are mountains so high?

Over millions of years, Earth's summits and valleys have moved and shifted, resulting in the dramatic landscapes of peaks and shadows we know today....

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