Monthly Archives: March 2017

New dinosaur species sheds light on evolution, provides facial makeover for tyrannosaurs

An investigation by a team of scientists from Australia, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, and Wisconsin has identified and named a new species of the...

The last caimans living in Spain

Sixteen million years ago, the reptile Diplocynodon ratelii lived in wooded ecosystems among the lakes and pools of what we know today as Catalonia...

Massive, computer-analyzed geological database reveals chemistry of ancient ocean

A study that used a new digital library and machine reading system to suck the factual marrow from millions of geologic publications dating back...

Male or female? Scientist challenges evidence of sex differences among dinosaurs

A paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or...

New research disproves common assumption on cranial joints of alligators, birds, dinosaurs

Paleontologists have long assumed that the shape of joints in the skulls of dinosaurs, and their closest modern relatives alligators and birds, reveals how...

A seismic mapping milestone

Because of Earth's layered composition, scientists have often compared the basic arrangement of its interior to that of an onion. There's the familiar thin...

Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth’s crust

Stock traders have long used specialized trackers to decide when to buy or sell a stock, or when the market is beginning to make...

How a young-looking lunar volcano hides its true age

While orbiting the Moon in 1971, the crew of Apollo 15 photographed a strange geological feature -- a bumpy, D-shaped depression about two miles...

Legends of the lost reservoirs

Tucked away in a laboratory in University of Cincinnati's Braunstein Hall are tubes of rock and dirt that quietly tell a story—a story that...

‘Australia’s Jurassic Park’ the world’s most diverse

An unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometre stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed "Australia's Jurassic Park." A...

More than 100 years of flooding and erosion in one event

Sara Rathburn of Colorado State University and colleagues have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. Vrain Creek in...

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution

In a new paper published in National Science Review, a team of scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, the Shandong Tianyu...

How chewing like a cow helped early mammals thrive

You probably haven't given much thought to how you chew, but the jaw structure and mechanics of almost all modern mammals may have something...

New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree

More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research...

Upper part of Earth’s magnetic field reveals details of a dramatic past

Satellites have been mapping the upper part of the Earth magnetic field by collecting data for three years and found some amazing features about...

Past Quakes at Fault: Abrupt Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands

A California State University, Fullerton faculty-student study shows evidence of abrupt sinking of the wetlands near Seal Beach, Calif., caused by ancient earthquakes that...

Geothermal gradient

Geothermal gradient is the rate of increasing temperature with respect to increasing depth in the Earth's interior. Away from tectonic plate boundaries, it is...

Kaikoura quake may prompt rethink of earthquake hazard models internationally

Last November's magnitude 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake was so complex and unusual that it is likely to lead to changes in the way scientists think...

Rocks that tell our industrial history

Researchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Analytical Chemistry have published a study in which they analyse cemented sand formations that contain industrial waste produced...

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

The striking north face of the Bernese Alps is the result of a steep rise of rocks from the depths following a collision of...

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